President Anders O. Bjarklev. Photo: Steen Brogaard

DTU welcomes Danish government’s research strategy

Wednesday 06 Dec 17

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Anders Overgaard Bjarklev
President
+45 45 25 10 00
The Danish government’s new strategy for research and innovation is well in line with DTU’s strategy.

“With its new strategy for Danish research and innovation, the government steps up the ambitions that Denmark as a nation should have for technical and natural science research. We are very pleased at DTU, and we look forward to working together with the government on meeting the promises that the strategy gives Danish society,” says DTU President Anders Bjarklev in connection with the publication of the government’s strategy for Danish research and innovation: ‘Denmark—ready for the future’ (‘Danmark—klar til fremtiden’).

“The ambition to promote research in fields such as life sciences, artificial intelligence, big data, and quantum computing is completely in line with DTU’s own plans for the future. We are therefore very satisfied with the objective that the research in these fields must be strengthened, and that it is a focus area for the government that the results create value to benefit Danish society.”

"The ambition to promote research in fields such as life sciences, artificial intelligence, big data, and quantum computing is completely in line with DTU’s own plans for the future."
Anders Bjarklev, President of DTU

According to Anders Bjarklev, the strategy’s two overarching objectives—that Danish research must be of the highest international quality and that research must benefit society to the greatest extent possible—go perfectly hand in hand with DTU’s strategy.

“DTU ranks among the top European technical universities. But our goal is to get even closer to the top, so it is a great encouragement to us that the government both wants to strengthen Danish elite research, increase the general scientific quality, and boost international cooperation even further,” says Anders Bjarklev.

“Research in engineering solutions is costly because it requires laboratories, workshops, and other infrastructure, which are both very expensive to establish and operate. This is why we for a long time have stressed that Denmark—compared with leading industrialized countries—allocates a far too small share of its gross domestic product to technical research.

In 2014, the share was 14 per cent compared to 43 per cent and 20 per cent in South Korea and Germany, respectively. It does, in other words, require very large amounts just to get close to our competitors. But with that being said, we do, of course, look forward to cooperating with the government on bringing Danish research even closer to the global top, and to the Danish government strengthening the technical sciences. The new strategy gives rise to very high expectations, and I look forward to seeing it be realized.”


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