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2020
Tadea Veng. Foto: Mikal Schlosser
10 FEB

Global sea level rise is accelerating

Using data from European satellites, a young student at DTU Space has demonstrated that the global sea level rise has accelerated over the past four decades.  

Climate change Polar research Marine research Satelittes
2019
This satellite photo taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission 9 June 2019 shows a swirl of sea ice off the east coast of Greenland.  (Image: ESA)
16 JUL

New study underlines sea level rise in the Arctic ocean

Sea levels in the Arctic oceans have risen an average of 2.2 millimeters per year over the last 22 years.This is the conclusion reached by a Danish-German research team...

Earth observation Satelittes Climate change
Michael Schultz Rasmussen takes up his position as head of the new Geo-division i August 2019, he comes from a position as manager at COWI A/S. (Photo: DTU Space/COWI)
07 JUN

DTU Space appoints head of new Geo-division

Michael Schultz Rasmussen has been appointed Head of Division for the new Space Geodesy Division at DTU Space. He comes from a position as manager at COWI A/S.

Earth observation Satelittes Climate change Mapping and surveying Earth sciences
2018
ASIM ready for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo: ESA/DTU Space/Terma.
15 JAN

DTU part of six significant space missions this year

At regular intervals in 2018, a mission to which DTU contributes will launch into space.

Space research Climate change Satelittes
2017
Rink Glacier in Greenland. Photo: NASA/OIB.
21 DEC

Unique climate mission to end as an impressive shooting star

DTU Space has made a big scientific contribution to NASA’s climate research mission GRACE, which is now ending after 15 years.

Space research Satelittes Climate change Ice research
2015
Kangiata Nunata Sermia in Southwest Greenland The image shows different lines that marks the extent of the ice at different points in  time. The upper trimline (transition) between the ligther and darker valley sides marks the extent of the glacier during the Little Ice Age, while the lower lines shows the extent at later points in time. The height of the trimline is derived from aerial imagery, and this information is used to calculate the mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the twentieth century. Credit: Nicolaj Krog Larsen, Aarhus Universitet
17 DEC

Dramatic reduction of the Greenland Ice Sheet in the 20th century

For the very first time, climate researchers from the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, together with, among others, DTU Space publish in...

Ice research Climate change Mapping and surveying Polar research Satelittes Earth observation